25 June 2015

Doorway details


Found inside the Belvedere. Photo taken in May 2015.

21 comments:

  1. Whoever did it, did wonderful work.

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  2. Very elaborate. Wondering about all the symbolism...

    Janis
    GDP

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  3. Looks like this might just be the Belvedere's crowning glory!

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  4. A very regal detail Hal!
    p.s. it was funny today, Aimee and I walked past the Halycon Bar in Wolfe Lane today and Aimee said 'I'm sure I've seen that sign on Facebook Mum' :)

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  5. It;s all ,in the details. Tom The Backroads Traveller

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  6. Gorgeous. I just returned from a few days in Austria.... didn't manage to get to the Belvedere, but saw lots of other parts of Vienna. Will be posting pix soon.
    Just watched Woman in Gold..... lots of scenes of the Belvedere there.

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  7. How intricate - I like it a lot!

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  8. Definitely the look of old Europe!

    Janis
    GDP

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  9. Berlin was a most interesting place--hearing about that city when I was ten years old and that Hitler had shot himself there. The so-called "War Years" after Pearl Harbor were sometimes fearful for me and always shortages of everything--plus rationing. We never had much money but it was just as well because there wasn't much to buy. No meat, sugar, salt, things like that made cooking hard for my mother who only cooked what we raised in our vegetable garden. Mother raised chickens for their eggs but we did not eat them until they had laid all of their eggs. Then they became known as "old" hens and we ate them instead of continuing to feed them. We didn't have a car so we could only go as far as we could walk and those folks who owned cars had to buy gasoline by the gallon as it was rationed and each driver got a ration sticker that he had to post on the car windshield--a Class A sticker meant the car could get his tank filled but other sticker numbers meant they could only buy as many gallons as the sticker indicated and that meant there wasn't many cars on the roads. I never saw a real door knocker when I was growing up. If you knocked on a door it was only when the door was closed. Most folks left their doors open and unlocked so visitors could at least get inside and get themselves a drink of water or eat leftovers still on the kitchen table.

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